Welcome to Westside Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


High Triglycerides & Diabetes


DO YOU HAVE HIGH TRIGLYCERIDES & DIABETES?

 
Clinical Research Enrolling Now!

For more information call:
(904) 693-1490

Migraine Headaches


DO YOU SUFFER WITH MIGRAINE HEADACHES?

Migraine Research Enrolling Now!

For more information call:
(904) 693-1490





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Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Lateshia Taylor

Lateshia is a research assistant and lab technician at the Westside office and has been a member of our research family for 14 years (since 2005). She loves to travel and try new outdoor adventures with her son, Shumbae. And when she says adventures, she’s talking zip-lining, camping and river-rafting. Her favorite sport is football and she is a Jaguars fan, but as the mom of a busy 10-year-old, she also appreciates quiet time reading and the occasional pampering pedicure or massage. 

While she tells us that she doesn’t really have a favorite food, she does warn us that she will NOT eat peas or beans. She hates peas and beans. 

Lateshia also admits that her guilty pleasure is messy reality TV.

Lastest Blog Post:


Is it hot in here, or is it me?

Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth. Your skin might redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause sweating, and if you lose too much body heat, you might feel chilled afterward. Although other medical conditions can cause them, hot flashes most commonly are due to menopause. Hot flashes are the most common symptom of the menopausal transition. Frequency of hot flashes can range from a few a week to several an hour. They can be mild or severe enough to interfere with qualify of life. There are a variety of treatments for particularly bothersome hot flashes.

Symptoms
During a hot flash, you might have a sudden feeling of warmth, a flushed appearance with red blotchy skin, rapid heartbeat, perspiration, a chilled feeling as the hot flash lets up.

Causes
The cause of hot flashes isn't known, but it's likely related to several factors. These include changes in reproductive hormones and in your body's thermostat, which becomes more sensitive to slight changes in body temperature.

Complications
Nighttime hot flashes (night sweats) can wake you from sleep and, over time, can cause chronic insomnia. There is some association with hot flashes and increased risk of heart disease and bone loss.

Don’t suffer in silence!

Diagnosis
Your doctor can usually diagnose hot flashes based on a description of your symptoms. Your doctor might suggest blood tests to check whether you're in menopausal transition. Before your appointment: make a list of your symptoms, how many hot flashes you have a day and how severe they are, medications, herbs, vitamins and supplements you take, including doses, questions to ask your doctor.

Treatment
Discuss the pros and cons of various treatments with your doctor. There are prescription and non-prescription medications available. Hot flashes subside gradually for most women, even without treatment, but it can take several years for them to stop. 

Lifestyle and home remedies
If your hot flashes are mild you may be able to manage them with lifestyle changes without medication.  Keep cool.  Dress in layers so that you can remove clothing when you feel warm. Use a fan or air conditioner. Lower the room temperature. Sip a cold drink.  Watch what you eat and drink. Hot and spicy foods, caffeinated beverages, and alcohol can trigger hot flashes.  Relax. Meditation; slow, deep breathing; or other stress-reducing techniques may help.  Don't smoke. Smoking is linked to increased hot flashes. as well as your risk of many serious health conditions,  Lose weight. If you're overweight or obese, losing weight might help ease your hot flashes.

Mind and body approaches
A growing body of evidence suggests that certain techniques can help ease hot flashes. Mindfulness meditation: This type of meditation has you focus on what's happening from moment to moment. Acupuncture: Some studies indicate that acupuncture might reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes. Hypnosis: Some research indicates that hypnosis might help relieve hot flashes. Cognitive behavioral therapy: This type of talk therapy may help you cope better with hot flashes.

Dietary supplements
People often assume that "natural" products cause no harm. However, all supplements may have potentially harmful side effects, and supplements can also interact with medications you're taking for other medical conditions. Always review what you're taking with your doctor.
 
 
Clinical trials
Research is underway to find new and better treatments for managing hot flashes.  This may be an especially attractive option if your hot flashes are frequent and severe enough to interfere with your quality of life.  Research can give you an option other that hormone therapy, for those that wish to avoid hormones.
 
Written by: Julia Baker, RN, CCRC
Resource: www.mayoclinic.org
 

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